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The Wall Avenue Journal: Boeing's 787 Dreamliner supply is more likely to be delayed till the tip of October

Deliveries of Boeing Co.'s 787 Dreamliner are likely to remain on hold until at least the end of October as the aircraft manufacturer failed to convince aviation safety officials to approve its proposal to inspect the aircraft, people familiar with the matter said.

With almost all deliveries on hold for almost a year, airlines and others have Boeing
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Customers can increasingly use the delay to forego deliveries or to negotiate concessions from the aerospace giant. Deliveries were initially halted as the company and the Federal Aviation Administration began investigating the aircraft's manufacturing defects. The raid stifled Boeing's important source of money and complicated plans for airlines.

The impasse has kept Boeing from shipping more than $ 25 billion worth of Dreamliners. Boeing said it has around 100 of the jets waiting to be delivered in late June. List prices for Dreamliner start at around $ 250 million, but customers typically pay around half that after customary discounts. The Dreamliner was first delivered in 2011, has an excellent safety record, and the fleet in operation was heavily used during the pandemic.

At a meeting on Aug. 2, Boeing's quality assurance specialists told their FAA colleagues that three aircraft are representative of how Boeing employees have put together 106 finished aircraft awaiting delivery, people familiar with the matter said. It was part of a larger, month-long effort to convince the agency to approve an inspection method that speeds deliveries through targeted controls rather than patchy demolitions.

However, at least one other Boeing engineer told the regulator he didn't support that assessment, these people said. He didn't think the trio of planes reflected how the rest of the undelivered planes were built. The engineer is part of a group of Boeing employees who represent the FAA internally at the company, said one of those people.

An expanded version of this report appears on WSJ.com.

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