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The Moneyist: Get Free Cash: Folks get a $ 600 stimulus test and $ 300 further unemployment. Why is there no accountability?

I am concerned that people will get an additional 11 weeks of unemployment benefits, along with an additional $ 300 per week. I have no problem helping those who need them. It is so sad to see families suffer financially.

But what about these other people who received it? They are dependent on their parents, live in beautiful houses and are looked after. I've heard of numerous situations where a young adult had a part-time summer job in the summer of 2019 and was filed for unemployment in March.

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"I heard about a family whose children received a check for $ 6,000 for unemployment in July." They had been collecting unemployment since March. You live in an affluent neighborhood where houses are valued at $ 300,000. "

They received all of the benefits since March, including an additional $ 600 per week. They won't look for a job because they have free money with nothing to do. There were many vacancies and companies couldn't fill them.

Now these people have 50 weeks of free money and another $ 300 a week of unemployment. There is no accountability for trying to find a job in New York. I heard of a case where the young adult bought a new used car with cash. Another is nearing $ 13,000 in unemployment savings.

There should be a free application for a Federal Student Aid-like (FAFSA) form that will fill in all of the family's financial information and parents' income. Colleges do it. If you are dependent and your parents are making a certain amount of money, those dependents should not receive benefits.

I heard about a family whose children received a check for $ 6,000 in July for unemployment because they couldn't work in a local school district. They had been collecting unemployment since March. You live in an affluent neighborhood where homes are valued at $ 300,000.

How stupid. I would fire the New York State Department of Labor commissioner.

What do you think?

Fed up of waste

The money is:My mother gave me a considerable financial gift. I gave it back. My future ex-husband says half is his

Dear Fed Up,

You have heard of many people doing many things. Most of the time, it sounds to me like they are trying to live their lives to the best of their ability and can forego being judged and / or shamed for their decisions by their friends and neighbors.

I heard a couple of things too. I've heard of 5.51 million unemployed. This is a low point for the pandemic and I am delighted. I've heard that many of these people are running out of government benefits and have moved to a temporary federal aid program because they still can't find work.

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"I've heard of people who haven't worked in years because they inherited family benefits, but I haven't heard anyone complain that they are cheating on the system, or working, or somehow not contributing to society."

– The money is

I've heard that federal unemployment benefits have more than tripled since August, a sign of rising long-term unemployment that may not be easily reversible once the pandemic ends. I've heard that 20.65 million people have received benefits from eight different state and federal programs.

I've heard of many requirements to qualify for unemployment in New York. I've heard that some states ask for $ 1,000 in income earned compared to the previous base year, while others require $ 5,000. I've heard that people through no fault of their own have to be laid off to qualify for unemployment insurance. I've heard that some states even require proof that you're looking for a job.

The money is:My friend's ex-wife challenged her two sons as dependent on their taxes and received their stimulus checks, but they live with us

I heard that the $ 900 billion stimulus package, which offers millions of people half the amount as the first package, was badly needed due to the continued surge in COVID-19 cases and the resulting business shutdowns. I heard layoffs rose and consumer confidence fell, which has sparked a wider economic slowdown.

People hear stories and see what their neighbors, their cousins, or the guy they never liked anyway, have been doing since they lost their jobs. They judge their behavior without knowing anything about what they are going through and, as such, decide that they do not deserve or take advantage of the pandemic. It's the valley of the narrowed windows.

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"I've heard of friends whose businesses turned to dust overnight who fought valiantly to come to terms with the reality of having to let go of those dreams after 30 years of hard work as they face rising bills every day . "

– The money is

It's easy to focus on an example of someone who is off the road and buys a car or decides to live with their parents to save money and not just call them to see if they're acting appropriately or ethically, but also extrapolate the situation in order to make comprehensive statements about Americans who work or cheat the system.

I've heard from Yale economists who "found no evidence that more generous perks wanted to get work back at the start of expansion or as a company over time". I heard that workers who received a larger increase in unemployment benefit saw very similar job gains in early May.

I heard that a study by the Federal Reserve of Chicago found that those currently receiving benefits "search more than twice as hard as those who have exhausted their benefits." Unemployment benefit typically lasts six months and pays individuals an average of around 35% of their previous weekly wage.

The money is: I made $ 100,000 in 2019, but far less in 2020. Why haven't I received a stimulus check? How is that fair?

I've heard of people who haven't worked in years because they inherited family allowances, but I haven't heard anyone complain that they are cheating on the system, or working, or somehow not contributing to society. Nor have I heard them lower the tone in the neighborhood by sitting around all day buying things with money they didn't make themselves.

I have heard from friends in New York whose businesses turned to dust overnight due to the impact of COVID-19 on the service industry and who have fought valiantly to come to terms with the reality that they will have to let go of those dreams after 30 years of hard work as they face rising bills every day, wondering if they will ever have a business or even go back to work.

I've heard of friends who have been laid off and those who have to face their co-workers and tell them it's all over. I heard them tell me stories about how they had to reassess their place in the world as they flipped through photos of their empty warehouses and told me that this is the reality of the US economy behind all these closed restaurants. I heard their stories and felt what I thought was the heat of their pain and saw the trauma on their faces.

I've heard a lot of things, but I try my best not to pretend I have the answers or any answers. I try to remind myself that it is dangerous to believe that there are others who deserve less than me. I've lived in the United States for nearly a decade and have heard from many people who tell other people what they do and what they don't deserve and how to live their lives. It is exhausting. Life is easier when you stop monitoring the behavior of others.

Stop looking over the garden fence and berating your neighbors and ask what YOU can do to help. Mind your own household and I will try to do the same.

You can email The Moneyist at qfottrell@marketwatch.com with financial and ethical questions related to coronavirus

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