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Gratitude in a troublesome yr

This year has taken so many turns that we couldn't count – we were often overwhelmed by a whirlwind of thoughts and emotions. Sadness, fear, and sheer disappointment are just a handful that come to mind when we think about the endless amount of curveballs that life has thrown in the past year. Tragedy and loss plagued the whole world and left us speechless day after day. Despite the darkness looming for what seemed like an eternity, there were a lot of positive things that we cannot remember. As 2020 is drawing to a close, let us take the time to decompress and reflect on the happier moments that we were fortunate enough to live and witness. Even if Thanksgiving looks less traditional than in previous years, we can still name a few things that move our hearts to a place of gratitude.

First the family

Let's face it – the hustle and bustle of life affects our family and friends more than we'd like to admit. Competing schedules, conflicts, and insufficient time for those who matter are often reasons why we are unable to care for the people who are close and dear to us. Due to travel restrictions and other entertainment options, we had to be more creative with our indoor time. This, in turn, helps us to restore the importance of the work-life balance. In all honesty, it allowed us to hit the pause button for anything that was probably inadvertently high on the priority list in the past. Our families served as the safety net it should be when the weight of the world (and social media) became overwhelming with less-than-desirable news. We have taken advantage of the technology to a new extent to schedule virtual happy hours, meet up with loved ones, and celebrate birthday parties in other geographic areas. We really appreciated exactly what we took for granted. all of the people who make up our family line.

Curate and develop passions

The year 2020 has brought a new level of introspection so we really need to think about what we value most. Whether it's career-related or new passion projects, this year has created space for much-needed self-reflection so that we can reassess where our fulfillment is really coming from. Using books, social media, and various streams of knowledge-based information, we have embarked on a journey of rediscovery. Do you remember that "other" to do list filled with the things you really don't want to do around the house? It even made this list appear full of fun! Home improvement projects and home improvement work were done with joy and budget. Adulthood can be full of things that aren't that exciting, but having the courage to take ideas from idea to execution served as a second wind. New business and sideline activities were launched with unmatched creativity, a place many of us haven't been in a while. Existing businesses have flourished despite the unprecedented events at the national level. Various business owners have also been funded which has given many small businesses the opportunity to increase their visibility while generating positive profit.

The importance of sustainability

There are countless families who have been hit by job loss and / or unexpected expenses. It doesn't matter if things started out financially rocky – most importantly, you're still standing. Getting in on bills, getting rid of debts and saving are all things to be very proud of. Temporary difficulties don't have to become permanent problems. It will always be worthwhile to create a plan of action and stick to it no matter what. Celebrating small wins should never be overlooked. We've all dealt with it differently this year – but the most important thing is to find out what works for you. Rule of thumb for those struggling with "not enough" emotions: don't believe the hype. While there are multitudes of people who achieve great things, there are also many scammers. Social media is a highlight role, a virtual platform on which users can exchange any information at their own discretion. People are more likely to share their ups and downs. So keep in mind that you may only get a small part of the whole story. Don't look at someone else's life or realize what you've done yourself. Financial progress, no matter how insignificant you find it, is still progress. We all make financial missteps and life has the potential to make things very difficult that hit us where it really hurts. Keeping your head afloat, staying afloat, maintaining your health, and caring for your family should never be viewed as a minor achievement. Give yourself some grace and think about the commitment it took to get (and stay) where you are.

Back to the basics

This year has forced us to really focus on the essentials and to set priorities accordingly. This applies to our lives, but above all to our finances. Pulling back the curtain to really take a look and evaluate where the money is going served as a constant reminder that we should do this more than once or twice a year. It's never too late (or too early) to start creating new money habits! Financial stability is essential – and perhaps the pillow we envisioned has proven to be untrue. Our willingness to make changes faster to keep our families financially secure felt less painful and much more conscious. The uncertainty about everything that was happening enabled us to complain less and at the same time to redefine the level of comfort with our emergency plans.

No matter what happened this year, what are you most grateful for? Whenever something comes to mind, be sure to write it down. Reference them when your days seem troubled or when your emotions force you to think about things that are not so positive. It is clear that we don't know what the future holds, but we know (and have been reintroduced) the moments, things and people that keep making us hopeful and grateful – no matter what lies ahead.

Marsha Barnes (8 posts)

Marsha Barnes is a financial guru with over 20 years of experience striving to empower women worldwide to be financially successful. Financial literacy and literacy are a passion of Marsha and provide clients with practical information that builds their general confidence in their personal finances.

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